Moroccan kills Italian “because he appeared to be happy”

On Monday, April 1, Said Mechaout, a 27-year-old Italian, made his appearance confessing to having killed Stefano Leo, the 33-year-old from Biella stabbed last February 23 along the Murazzi, the Po river embankment area in Turin, famous for its many clubs night. Investigators had been searching for Leo’s killer for over a month, but his face was unrecognizable from the surveillance camera footage and until Sunday there had been no significant progress in the investigation. Today the newspapers report extensive excerpts from the report provided by the investigators on the confession of Mechaout: excerpts that are therefore second-hand, and to be taken for now with a bit of caution. Mechaout would have said he killed Stefano Leo for no particular reason, choosing him casually from passersby. It is still difficult to understand the real motive of the murder, given that the available information comes from the reports made by the newspapers of his interrogation: it seems however that Mechaout came from a period of great depression and difficulties, and that this condition led him to kill , apparently convinced of revenge. “When asked why Stefano, he explained that he had waited at least twenty minutes,” writes Marco Imarisio on Corriere della Sera, «That Saturday, February 23, observing the faces of passers-by, the pensioners walking with the dog, the mothers with children, the boys who talked and joked in groups. And then he saw him, with that “happy and serene” air that seemed unbearable to him. ” The print he adds that Mechaout – who was born in Morocco before being adopted and then naturalized – would have decided to hit “a white man” because he would “make a sensation”. Leo worked as a clerk in a clothing store and it seems he didn’t know Mechaout. Mechaout had married very young and had a criminal record for family maltreatment. In 2012 he had a son with a woman from Turin, who had left him in 2015: from there, the newspapers write, a period of depression started for him. Mechaout had moved to Morocco, then to Ibiza, and then returned to Turin, where he had neither a job nor a home: he lived in a homeless dorm set up by the Municipality and the Red Cross in Piazza D’Armi. It looks like Mechaout spent the night before the murder of Stefano Leo right in the homeless dorm. In the morning, the newspapers write, he had gone to a discount store to buy a knife, to then reach the Murazzi by tram, arriving on the Lungo Po Machiavelli promenade, a place he would have chosen because from there he could easily escape. At that point, according to the reconstruction of the newspapers, he would have sat waiting for the right person to kill to pass. At one point he would have a fight with a boy who was walking with a dog, scolding him for taking pictures. The reconstructions suggest that Mechaout thought of killing him, only to change his mind because at that time there were too many people to attend. Then came Stefano Leo, who lived not far from there. Second The print, Mechaout would have let him pass, then he would have got up and stabbed him over it. Leo managed to drag himself to a flight of steps, where he died soon after. Mechaout instead escaped immediately, and reached the number 16 tram stop on Via Bava to return to the dormitory. During the escape he hid the knife in an electricity booth, still in Piazza d’Armi, on the corner with Corso Galileo Ferraris. After more than a month since the murder, last Sunday he decided to spontaneously deliver himself to the Carabinieri of Turin. The weapon used in the murder was found by the police where it was originally hidden.

https://www.archyworldys.com/what-is-known-about-the-murder-of-stefano-leo/

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